Blog

I let the culture in, let it challenge and change me. And in that changing, I became someone better, I think. Oh, the Yukon knew how to woo me: picking cranberries on your belly in the forest; racing across a frozen lake holding on to a dogsled; canoeing the Yukon River from the city centre to the center of peace and eagles; going to the Available Light Film Festival at the Arts Centre even on a -30 day with friends; CD and book launches packed to the rafters with friends; walking home through the city on a summer night in full sunlight; hot-tubbing outside when it’s -25C, your hair freezing, talking with your gang and watching the aurora dance above you.

By Michael Hawes, CEO Fulbright Canada, 1999-2000 Fulbright Scholar from Queen’s University to UC Berkeley

By any measure, 2015 was an incredible year for Fulbright Canada. We celebrated our 25th anniversary, launched the new Fulbright Arctic Initiative with a highly successful series of meetings in Iqaluit, developed exciting new partnerships with universities in both countries, and welcomed our first cohort of Fulbright Canada – Palix Visiting Research Chairs in Brain Science and Family Wellness. At the same time, we co-sponsored a symposium on Arctic Governance at the University of California at Irvine, hosted a series of events for Earth Day, sponsored two art shows – one in Ottawa and one in Washington – featuring the work of Fulbright alumna and Arctic photographer Acacia Johnson, dramatically increased the activities of EducationUSA in Canada, co-hosted another successful round of the Youth Ambassadors Program, and renewed key partnerships with public and private sector partners. In the process, we managed to grow both the reputation and the size of our Killam Fellowships program and the Fulbright program in Canada.

read more

The goal of this Fulbright Canada-U.S. Embassy in Ottawa Community Leadership Program project, led by Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM) Professors Victor Armony and Bernard Duhaime, was to foster a conversation about the legacy of human rights violations and crimes against humanity in Latin America, particularly as part of a collective memory shared by many Canadians of Latin American heritage. The project’s core idea was that, by creating opportunities for the expression and exchange on these issues, it may become possible to preserve and help disseminate accounts of individual experiences by victims, to engage participants in understanding and discussing the history of state-sponsored political violence, persecution, and discrimination in Latin America, and to consider the implications of a duty of remembrance for Latin American diasporas—specific to their national origins but also as part of the larger Canadian story of inclusive citizenship and global responsibility to protect. The Latin American population in Canada is rapidly growing and integrating into the larger society. Compared to Hispanics in the United States, Canada’s Latinos constitute a much smaller, recent and diverse minority, one that as yet has not developed a full sense of community. However, there are some elements that point to an emerging common identity among Canadian Latin Americans, which are in part related to a shared experience of “low-intensity citizenship” and “incomplete democracy” in their countries of origin. In order to explore how the (personal or transmitted) memory of injustices committed by Latin American governments brings together individuals of different backgrounds, allows them to discuss their lasting effects, and also encourages them to formulate their idea of what a fully realized citizenship means, several activities were planned.

read more


For a 6th consecutive year in a row, Canadian Lawyer Magazine has published its “Top 25 Most Influential Lawyers in Canada” and Pascale Fournier features in it! Nominated in the “World Stage” Category, which celebrates the influence of Canadian lawyers on the international scene, Professor Fournier was selected for her humanitarian involvement and the large scope of her academic contributions beyond Canadian borders. The selection committee used the following criteria: “We have endeavoured to select the most influential within the law over the last 18 years, looking at every area of practice. It’s about respect, ability to influence public opinion, and help shape the laws of the country; contribution to the strength and quality of legal services; and social and political influence and involvement.” A video presents the 25 profils chosen by their peers !

read more

New Brunswick is infinitely richer for the commitment, spirit and talent of Thaddeus Holownia,an internationally renowned photographer.

Mr. Holownia grew up in England and Ontario. In the late 1970s, he became a professor of fine arts at Mount Allison University, where he is currently head of the department. Mr. Holownia has produced many impressive bodies of work that push the boundaries of his art form while documenting this region’s cultural history. He is known for his Jolicure Pond series, in which he photographed the same subject in different seasons under different lighting conditions.  His photographs and book works have been acquired by some of the finest museums in Canada. His work has been shown in the United States, France, Germany, Belgium, Mexico and the Czech Republic.  Mr. Holownia is a member of the Royal Canadian Academy of Fine Arts (RCA) and is a Fulbright Canada Fellow.

read more

By Victoria Herrmann, Fulbright Student 2013-2014
Posted originally on The Guardian, Monday 27 July 2015

The Arctic is warming at a rate almost twice the global average, making climate change’s effects there far more intense and rapid than any other ecosystem in the world. While nature photographs of polar bears and melting ice dominate media narratives, the top of the world is home to 4m people who face an uncertain future.

Coastal erosion, forest fires and storm surges are threatening the physical and economic safety of settlements across the Arctic Ocean shoreline. Further inland, thawing permafrost is compromising the stability of transportation, sanitation and public service infrastructure built upon once-sturdy foundations. In Alaska alone, 31 villages face imminent threat of destruction from erosion and flooding. Many of these villages have 10 to 20 years of livability before their streets, schools and homes become uninhabitable. At least 12 have decided to relocate – in part or entirely – to safer ground to avoid total collapse.

read more

Are you ready to start your journey?