Blog

I let the culture in, let it challenge and change me. And in that changing, I became someone better, I think. Oh, the Yukon knew how to woo me: picking cranberries on your belly in the forest; racing across a frozen lake holding on to a dogsled; canoeing the Yukon River from the city centre to the center of peace and eagles; going to the Available Light Film Festival at the Arts Centre even on a -30 day with friends; CD and book launches packed to the rafters with friends; walking home through the city on a summer night in full sunlight; hot-tubbing outside when it’s -25C, your hair freezing, talking with your gang and watching the aurora dance above you.

By Victoria Chraïbi, Fulbright Student 2009-2010,  from Hanover College to McGill University

The sun is shining, the buds are blooming, the insects are emerging. It’s the season for gardening!

Gardens are hot spots of beauty and, with increasing necessity, biodiversity. Pollinators, especially bees, are declining in North America. Pollinator gardens are popping up in urban areas to provide much-needed sanctuaries. The plant selection for original pollinator gardens were designed for areas with substantial water resources, and did not translate well to drought-stressed regions.

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“The opportunity to spend a semester there as a Fulbright scholar has changed the way I look at military education, the private sector, and America’s global role.”

By Dr. David Last, 2015-2016 Fulbright Visiting Research Chair in Peace and War Studies at Norwich University

The road from Montpelier to Northfield, Vermont, winds through a narrow valley flanked by the Dog River and the Vermont Yankee Railway. Arriving in Northfield in January I was puzzled by the house numbers—1824, 1848, 1853—until I realized that these were the dates they were built. Norwich University is the oldest private military academy in America, established in 1819 and moved to Northfield after a fire in 1866. It was the birthplace of the Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) in 1916, and plays an important role in developing new models for citizen soldier education.

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Fulbright Canada is now accepting applications for our core Canadian Scholar and Canadian Student competitions!  Awards are granted to Canadian scholars and students to undertake a program of residential exchange in the United States. These awards are meant to support research, degree programs, and teaching opportunities in the United States.

Opens: May 15th, 2016

Closes: November 15th, 2016 at 5pm EST

Scholars

Fulbright Canada awards support exceptional scholars and established independent researchers.  Apply now to various openings in the Fulbright Visiting Research Chairs Program (US$25,000 per academic semester) and the Traditional Fulbright Scholar Awards Program(US$12,500 per academic semester).

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By Starr Brainard, 2015-2016 Independent Researcher in Canada

I am currently about three months into my Fulbright experience. Come spring, I will be happily getting my hands dirty collecting production data from various alternative farms in Central Alberta. In the mean time, my research consists mostly of of emails, literature reviews, and online surveys. While necessary and informative, these steps of my research aren’t pushing me out into the ecosystem of plants, animals, and most importantly people in my host community. I am fortunate to be interning with my community host organization ReThink Red Deer and be a Fulbright Canada-RBC Eco-Leader. Through ReThink Red Deer and The Fulbright Canada-RBC Eco-Leadership Program I have been able to engage my local community in meaningful and rewarding ways over the past few weeks.

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Presentation by Dr. Martin D. Heintzelman, Fulbright Visiting Research Chair in Environment and Economy at the University of Ottawa’s Institute of the Environment

Wind power is among the fastest growing energy sources in the world today, and is widely viewed as a substantial part of a clean energy future. However, implementation of wind energy is often controversial in areas where it is proposed, and concerns are often raised regarding potential negative impacts on local communities, including impacts on health and on property values. Some of these negative impacts may be offset by compensatory payments made by wind developers to both individual landowners who let out their land for the development and to communities. Additionally, host communities often have a say in approving the development or setting parameters. However, if the development is near borders between municipalities, states, or even countries, it is often the case that one or more jurisdictions will not have an opportunity to set such rules or demand compensation, but will, nonetheless, face some costs or impacts from the development. In such a situation, we would expect the property value impacts of a wind facility development to vary across these borders. We explore exactly this situation at the border between Canada and the United States in the Thousand Islands region of the St. Lawrence River.

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Are you ready to start your journey?