Blog

By Michael Hawes, CEO Fulbright Canada, 1999-2000 Fulbright Scholar from Queen’s University to UC Berkeley

By any measure, 2015 was an incredible year for Fulbright Canada. We celebrated our 25th anniversary, launched the new Fulbright Arctic Initiative with a highly successful series of meetings in Iqaluit, developed exciting new partnerships with universities in both countries, and welcomed our first cohort of Fulbright Canada – Palix Visiting Research Chairs in Brain Science and Family Wellness. At the same time, we co-sponsored a symposium on Arctic Governance at the University of California at Irvine, hosted a series of events for Earth Day, sponsored two art shows – one in Ottawa and one in Washington – featuring the work of Fulbright alumna and Arctic photographer Acacia Johnson, dramatically increased the activities of EducationUSA in Canada, co-hosted another successful round of the Youth Ambassadors Program, and renewed key partnerships with public and private sector partners. In the process, we managed to grow both the reputation and the size of our Killam Fellowships program and the Fulbright program in Canada. read more

– Originally published on Sustainable Prosperity


Martin D. Heintzelman is the Fulbright Visiting Chair at the University of Ottawa’s Institute of the Environment. He is on partial leave until April from his post as Associate Professor of Economics and Financial Studies and the Fredric C. Menz Scholar of Environmental Economics in the Clarkson University School of Business, as well as Director of the Clarkson University Center for Canadian Studies. He also serves on the executive committee of Clarkson’s Institute for a Sustainable Environment. Martin has an M.A. and a Ph.D. in Economics and an M.S. in Natural Resource Policy and Behavior from the University of Michigan as well as a BS in Economics from Duke University.
read more

By Cheryl A. Camillo, 2015-2016 Fulbright Scholar from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County to the University of Regina

In reflecting upon International Education Week (IEW), I came to understand that a Fulbright fellowship is a lifelong journey. The exchange experience does not start when one arrives in the host country, or even when one begins the Fulbright application, rather it starts when one first realizes the benefits of international exchange, which can happen as soon as one recognizes a difference between countries or their cultures. read more

By Justin Park, Fulbright 2015-2016 student from University of California-Los Angeles to Concordia University.

What is it about international education that challenges us to see the world in a different way? It is not only about recognizing the difference in language, culture and society, as we can be well conscious of it while being at home. It’s not just about checking off the places we have been wanting to visit. It has much more meaningful and deeper value to us as students.

As a Fulbright student in Montreal, I am given the opportunity to study my passion and interests in a brand new environment. One might think, how can Canada be that different from the United States? Speculations like these are all assumptions that we hold until they shatter in the light of new perspectives and thoughts following our arrival to a new place. Personally I see it as a first-hand opportunity to study immigration in a global context, to observe the naturalization process for African immigrants in a setting that is unique for its own immigration history and policy, and attempt to understand the thought process of immigrants to Canada. It may be possible to study this phenomenon without leaving the U.S. since the ever-developing technology allows us access to information at our fingertips. read more

By Allison Turner, 2015-2016 Fulbright Student from Purdue University at the University of Waterloo

I’ve been in Canada for two and a half months. I’ve been in graduate school for two of those months. What have I learned after all of that international education-ing(?). This: if you want to feel alive, go study abroad…but be prepared for quite a ride.

In the first few weeks of my program, I felt lonely and frustrated. I’m used to a packed schedule, but graduate school started off very slowly. I only take one course this semester, and the remainder of my work involves the solitary tasks of reading and writing. I had lots of questions, but I felt silly asking them. Most of my classmates enjoyed the company of a friend close by; I struggled to keep in touch with old friends and mentors, who were a nation away. read more

By Dr. Lomax Boyd, Fulbright Scholar 2015-2016

The studio of the National Film Board of Canada is one of the last places you might expect to find an American biologist.

Having spent years in a laboratory, my outlook on the world was solidly scientific. I had gone through the gauntlet of scientific training, published a respectable paper, and was set for the next step in a traditional scientific career. But what was once a side interest while in graduate school—producing intimate, visceral documentary films about science—had morphed into a fully fledged passion. The problem, however, was that no one funded that kind of passion! Or so I thought. read more

Are you ready to start your journey?