Blog

I let the culture in, let it challenge and change me. And in that changing, I became someone better, I think. Oh, the Yukon knew how to woo me: picking cranberries on your belly in the forest; racing across a frozen lake holding on to a dogsled; canoeing the Yukon River from the city centre to the center of peace and eagles; going to the Available Light Film Festival at the Arts Centre even on a -30 day with friends; CD and book launches packed to the rafters with friends; walking home through the city on a summer night in full sunlight; hot-tubbing outside when it’s -25C, your hair freezing, talking with your gang and watching the aurora dance above you.

By Victoria Chraïbi, Fulbright Student 2009-2010,  from Hanover College to McGill University

The sun is shining, the buds are blooming, the insects are emerging. It’s the season for gardening!

Gardens are hot spots of beauty and, with increasing necessity, biodiversity. Pollinators, especially bees, are declining in North America. Pollinator gardens are popping up in urban areas to provide much-needed sanctuaries. The plant selection for original pollinator gardens were designed for areas with substantial water resources, and did not translate well to drought-stressed regions. read more

Fulbright Canada is now accepting applications for our core Canadian Scholar and Canadian Student competitions!  Awards are granted to Canadian scholars and students to undertake a program of residential exchange in the United States. These awards are meant to support research, degree programs, and teaching opportunities in the United States.

Opens: May 15th, 2016

Closes: November 15th, 2016 at 5pm EST

Scholars

Fulbright Canada awards support exceptional scholars and established independent researchers.  Apply now to various openings in the Fulbright Visiting Research Chairs Program (US$25,000 per academic semester) and the Traditional Fulbright Scholar Awards Program(US$12,500 per academic semester). read more

By Justin Park, Fulbright 2015-2016 student from University of California-Los Angeles to Concordia University.

What is it about international education that challenges us to see the world in a different way? It is not only about recognizing the difference in language, culture and society, as we can be well conscious of it while being at home. It’s not just about checking off the places we have been wanting to visit. It has much more meaningful and deeper value to us as students.

As a Fulbright student in Montreal, I am given the opportunity to study my passion and interests in a brand new environment. One might think, how can Canada be that different from the United States? Speculations like these are all assumptions that we hold until they shatter in the light of new perspectives and thoughts following our arrival to a new place. Personally I see it as a first-hand opportunity to study immigration in a global context, to observe the naturalization process for African immigrants in a setting that is unique for its own immigration history and policy, and attempt to understand the thought process of immigrants to Canada. It may be possible to study this phenomenon without leaving the U.S. since the ever-developing technology allows us access to information at our fingertips. read more

By Allison Turner, 2015-2016 Fulbright Student from Purdue University at the University of Waterloo

I’ve been in Canada for two and a half months. I’ve been in graduate school for two of those months. What have I learned after all of that international education-ing(?). This: if you want to feel alive, go study abroad…but be prepared for quite a ride.

In the first few weeks of my program, I felt lonely and frustrated. I’m used to a packed schedule, but graduate school started off very slowly. I only take one course this semester, and the remainder of my work involves the solitary tasks of reading and writing. I had lots of questions, but I felt silly asking them. Most of my classmates enjoyed the company of a friend close by; I struggled to keep in touch with old friends and mentors, who were a nation away. read more

By Victoria Herrmann, Fulbright Student 2013-2014
Posted originally on The Guardian, Monday 27 July 2015

The Arctic is warming at a rate almost twice the global average, making climate change’s effects there far more intense and rapid than any other ecosystem in the world. While nature photographs of polar bears and melting ice dominate media narratives, the top of the world is home to 4m people who face an uncertain future.

Coastal erosion, forest fires and storm surges are threatening the physical and economic safety of settlements across the Arctic Ocean shoreline. Further inland, thawing permafrost is compromising the stability of transportation, sanitation and public service infrastructure built upon once-sturdy foundations. In Alaska alone, 31 villages face imminent threat of destruction from erosion and flooding. Many of these villages have 10 to 20 years of livability before their streets, schools and homes become uninhabitable. At least 12 have decided to relocate – in part or entirely – to safer ground to avoid total collapse. read more

Are you ready to start your journey?