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Presentation by Dr. Martin D. Heintzelman, Fulbright Visiting Research Chair in Environment and Economy at the University of Ottawa’s Institute of the Environment

Wind power is among the fastest growing energy sources in the world today, and is widely viewed as a substantial part of a clean energy future. However, implementation of wind energy is often controversial in areas where it is proposed, and concerns are often raised regarding potential negative impacts on local communities, including impacts on health and on property values. Some of these negative impacts may be offset by compensatory payments made by wind developers to both individual landowners who let out their land for the development and to communities. Additionally, host communities often have a say in approving the development or setting parameters. However, if the development is near borders between municipalities, states, or even countries, it is often the case that one or more jurisdictions will not have an opportunity to set such rules or demand compensation, but will, nonetheless, face some costs or impacts from the development. In such a situation, we would expect the property value impacts of a wind facility development to vary across these borders. We explore exactly this situation at the border between Canada and the United States in the Thousand Islands region of the St. Lawrence River.

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By Dr. Eileen Angelini, Professor of French at Canisus College, Fulbright Canada Specialist 2016

I had the incredible honor to accept the award for a Fulbright Specialist project in Canada at the University of Manitoba from January 3-16, 2016. I worked with faculty and graduate students in the Department of French, Spanish, and Italian in the Faculty of Arts, and education students and faculty in the Faculty of Education from the University of Manitoba and the Université de St. Boniface, on the project “Francophone Culture: Literature, Pedagogy, and Additional Language Acquisition.” I also gave public lectures and participated in community outreach at l’École St. Avilia, a French-immersion school. Moreover, I was able to meet with faculty in the Department of History, the Department of English, Film and Theatre, and the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation. read more

Originally posted on Norwich University’s Peace & War Center

NORTHFIELD, Vt. – Norwich University welcomes David Last, PhD, as a Fulbright Visiting Research Chair in the Peace and War Center this semester.

The program between Norwich Universityand the Foundation for Educational Exchange between Canada and the US establishes a Fulbright Visiting Research Chair at Norwich University to focus on research pertaining to military and diplomatic affairs.

Last brings vast experience from having served in the Canadian army for 30 years, and teaching political science and war studies at the Royal Military College of Canada since 1999. He is an accomplished scholar with a focus on understanding what our future officers and security professionals will need if they are to be successful in an uncertain future.

While at Norwich, Last plans to support two international initiatives that will involve bothNorwich students and cadets from Canada’s Royal Military College: an international seminar on non-violent conflict in Toronto, February 27-28, and an international field study of conflict perspectives in the Middle East in May. He will also be finishing a book for mid-career security professionals. read more

By Claire Gjertsen, 2015-2016 Killam Fellow from University of Calgary to American University

Over my trip, I visited the states of North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, and Tennessee. I visited Duke University and met with one of my favourite historians, Laura Edwards. I explored the cities of Durham, Chapel Hill, and Raleigh, meeting locals, visiting the universities, and meeting up with fellow Killam Fellow Andrew Royce Bauer.
In South Carolina, I spent time in Charleston where I befriended locals and visited plantations, ate barbecue, and visited more university campuses. I ended up skipping Savannah because I loved Charleston so much. read more

By Michael Hawes, CEO Fulbright Canada, 1999-2000 Fulbright Scholar from Queen’s University to UC Berkeley

By any measure, 2015 was an incredible year for Fulbright Canada. We celebrated our 25th anniversary, launched the new Fulbright Arctic Initiative with a highly successful series of meetings in Iqaluit, developed exciting new partnerships with universities in both countries, and welcomed our first cohort of Fulbright Canada – Palix Visiting Research Chairs in Brain Science and Family Wellness. At the same time, we co-sponsored a symposium on Arctic Governance at the University of California at Irvine, hosted a series of events for Earth Day, sponsored two art shows – one in Ottawa and one in Washington – featuring the work of Fulbright alumna and Arctic photographer Acacia Johnson, dramatically increased the activities of EducationUSA in Canada, co-hosted another successful round of the Youth Ambassadors Program, and renewed key partnerships with public and private sector partners. In the process, we managed to grow both the reputation and the size of our Killam Fellowships program and the Fulbright program in Canada. read more

How do we inspire the next generation of neuroscientists who will find cures for Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease? This is the mission of the Firefly Foundation in Toronto, and my community partner for Canada’s first hands-on Neuroscience summer research camp that runs every July at the University of Toronto Schools.


Hello! My name is Anand Mahadevan and I am one of the recipients of the 2015 Fulbright Community Leadership Program grants. Over the last three years, I have run Bright Lights in the Lab, a research based summer camp for kids in grades 6-12 in the greater Toronto area. This camp allows students to learn about neuroscience through hands-on inquiry activities and designing labs to measure action potential speeds in earthworms, rate coding in crickets, classical condition in fruit flies and nematodes as well as learning and behavior experiments using snails. Through our partners at the Department of Physiology, University of Toronto, we allow teenagers to meet and learn from graduate students, post-doctoral fellows and scientists at the forefront of innovative neuroscience in Canada. read more

Are you ready to start your journey?