Blog

By Starr Brainard, 2015-2016 Independent Researcher in Canada

I am currently about three months into my Fulbright experience. Come spring, I will be happily getting my hands dirty collecting production data from various alternative farms in Central Alberta. In the mean time, my research consists mostly of of emails, literature reviews, and online surveys. While necessary and informative, these steps of my research aren’t pushing me out into the ecosystem of plants, animals, and most importantly people in my host community. I am fortunate to be interning with my community host organization ReThink Red Deer and be a Fulbright Canada-RBC Eco-Leader. Through ReThink Red Deer and The Fulbright Canada-RBC Eco-Leadership Program I have been able to engage my local community in meaningful and rewarding ways over the past few weeks. read more

By Bruce Dupeyron, 2015 Community Leadership Project, 2013-2014 Fulbright Visiting Research Chair in Policy Studies, University of Texas at Austin

By focusing on Francophone minority communities, the main goal of this project has been to support educational institutions, in facilitating the integration of francophone newcomers. Although this project has involved several categories of actors, management and teaching staff, children, parents and community members, we have quickly recognized that allowing children to be key players was a central aspect to this project. In this context, children have been the main actors of this initiative, which has supported their discovery and practice of various ‘francophonies’, thanks to teachers who also reflect this diversity from Canada, Africa, and Europe.

These young children are registered in the daycare Gard’Amis, in Regina, Saskatchewan, in groups of children aged 1 to 5, and in the only francophone summer camp in Regina, Camp Troubadou, for children aged 6 to 12. The needs of children in the daycare vary substantially with age, but similarities between the groups exist, namely storytelling, music listening, dancing, directed and free play, indoor and outdoor activities allow children to learn and speak French in different contexts. The project has supported those activities by fostering learning with a more diverse repertoire of francophone educational material. After two rounds of consultation with the teaching staff of the daycare, we have been able to identify a range of complementary material that can be used mostly indoors, for example books, audio books, and toys that reflect the cultural diversity in the daycare, so that children can be more fluent in French and socialize with their friends. For instance, music discs featuring francophone songs for memorizing vocabulary and dancing, or lullabies from different francophone countries before going to nap, have been worthwhile. Anecdotally, one of the teachers has brought our attention to the fact that, during naptime, one or two children might wake up earlier than the others, and need to have a quiet activity: it has been suggested that having a book light might help in reading a story to them, which has complemented nicely the books that have been selected. In addition, since books written by Robert Munsch are a favorite of older children in this age group, some of them have been chosen for reading times, which often lead to questions, further exchanges and games. read more

Presentation by Dr. Martin D. Heintzelman, Fulbright Visiting Research Chair in Environment and Economy at the University of Ottawa’s Institute of the Environment

Wind power is among the fastest growing energy sources in the world today, and is widely viewed as a substantial part of a clean energy future. However, implementation of wind energy is often controversial in areas where it is proposed, and concerns are often raised regarding potential negative impacts on local communities, including impacts on health and on property values. Some of these negative impacts may be offset by compensatory payments made by wind developers to both individual landowners who let out their land for the development and to communities. Additionally, host communities often have a say in approving the development or setting parameters. However, if the development is near borders between municipalities, states, or even countries, it is often the case that one or more jurisdictions will not have an opportunity to set such rules or demand compensation, but will, nonetheless, face some costs or impacts from the development. In such a situation, we would expect the property value impacts of a wind facility development to vary across these borders. We explore exactly this situation at the border between Canada and the United States in the Thousand Islands region of the St. Lawrence River.

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By Dr. Eileen Angelini, Professor of French at Canisus College, Fulbright Canada Specialist 2016

I had the incredible honor to accept the award for a Fulbright Specialist project in Canada at the University of Manitoba from January 3-16, 2016. I worked with faculty and graduate students in the Department of French, Spanish, and Italian in the Faculty of Arts, and education students and faculty in the Faculty of Education from the University of Manitoba and the Université de St. Boniface, on the project “Francophone Culture: Literature, Pedagogy, and Additional Language Acquisition.” I also gave public lectures and participated in community outreach at l’École St. Avilia, a French-immersion school. Moreover, I was able to meet with faculty in the Department of History, the Department of English, Film and Theatre, and the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation. read more

Originally posted on Norwich University’s Peace & War Center

NORTHFIELD, Vt. – Norwich University welcomes David Last, PhD, as a Fulbright Visiting Research Chair in the Peace and War Center this semester.

The program between Norwich Universityand the Foundation for Educational Exchange between Canada and the US establishes a Fulbright Visiting Research Chair at Norwich University to focus on research pertaining to military and diplomatic affairs.

Last brings vast experience from having served in the Canadian army for 30 years, and teaching political science and war studies at the Royal Military College of Canada since 1999. He is an accomplished scholar with a focus on understanding what our future officers and security professionals will need if they are to be successful in an uncertain future.

While at Norwich, Last plans to support two international initiatives that will involve bothNorwich students and cadets from Canada’s Royal Military College: an international seminar on non-violent conflict in Toronto, February 27-28, and an international field study of conflict perspectives in the Middle East in May. He will also be finishing a book for mid-career security professionals. read more

By Claire Gjertsen, 2015-2016 Killam Fellow from University of Calgary to American University

Over my trip, I visited the states of North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, and Tennessee. I visited Duke University and met with one of my favourite historians, Laura Edwards. I explored the cities of Durham, Chapel Hill, and Raleigh, meeting locals, visiting the universities, and meeting up with fellow Killam Fellow Andrew Royce Bauer.
In South Carolina, I spent time in Charleston where I befriended locals and visited plantations, ate barbecue, and visited more university campuses. I ended up skipping Savannah because I loved Charleston so much. read more

Are you ready to start your journey?