Blog

By Jenika Heim, Program Officer, External Relations at Fulbright Canada

Originally published in Canadian Student Magazine, Fall 2015


Studying abroad is an exciting, even transformative, experience… and definitely something worth considering. With some 3,000 institutions to select from, the United States has one of the most vibrant and varied collections of colleges and universities in the world. There are world-class private colleges and universities, large research-intensive public universities, and, of course, prestigious liberal arts colleges nestled in beautiful pastoral college towns. With so many choices, it is easy to tailor your exchange to United States to the geographic and educational experience that will suit you.

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– Originally published on Sustainable Prosperity


Martin D. Heintzelman is the Fulbright Visiting Chair at the University of Ottawa’s Institute of the Environment. He is on partial leave until April from his post as Associate Professor of Economics and Financial Studies and the Fredric C. Menz Scholar of Environmental Economics in the Clarkson University School of Business, as well as Director of the Clarkson University Center for Canadian Studies. He also serves on the executive committee of Clarkson’s Institute for a Sustainable Environment. Martin has an M.A. and a Ph.D. in Economics and an M.S. in Natural Resource Policy and Behavior from the University of Michigan as well as a BS in Economics from Duke University.

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By Diyyinah Jamora, 2015-2016 Killam Fellow from the  University of Ottawa to the University of Maine

I come from Canada, born in Vancouver and studying in Ottawa. Just this August, I packed up my things and moved to a new university and a new home to call my own for the next four months: Maine. I had never been to New England or even seen the Atlantic Ocean prior to living in Orono. Looking at a map of the United States you would think, “so basically it’s Canada.” But I quickly learned that living in a small town in Maine is incredibly different than back home, and studying at an American college is a very different educational experience.

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By Cheryl A. Camillo, 2015-2016 Fulbright Scholar from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County to the University of Regina

In reflecting upon International Education Week (IEW), I came to understand that a Fulbright fellowship is a lifelong journey. The exchange experience does not start when one arrives in the host country, or even when one begins the Fulbright application, rather it starts when one first realizes the benefits of international exchange, which can happen as soon as one recognizes a difference between countries or their cultures.

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By Justin Park, Fulbright 2015-2016 student from University of California-Los Angeles to Concordia University.

What is it about international education that challenges us to see the world in a different way? It is not only about recognizing the difference in language, culture and society, as we can be well conscious of it while being at home. It’s not just about checking off the places we have been wanting to visit. It has much more meaningful and deeper value to us as students.

As a Fulbright student in Montreal, I am given the opportunity to study my passion and interests in a brand new environment. One might think, how can Canada be that different from the United States? Speculations like these are all assumptions that we hold until they shatter in the light of new perspectives and thoughts following our arrival to a new place. Personally I see it as a first-hand opportunity to study immigration in a global context, to observe the naturalization process for African immigrants in a setting that is unique for its own immigration history and policy, and attempt to understand the thought process of immigrants to Canada. It may be possible to study this phenomenon without leaving the U.S. since the ever-developing technology allows us access to information at our fingertips.

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By Allison Turner, 2015-2016 Fulbright Student from Purdue University at the University of Waterloo

I’ve been in Canada for two and a half months. I’ve been in graduate school for two of those months. What have I learned after all of that international education-ing(?). This: if you want to feel alive, go study abroad…but be prepared for quite a ride.

In the first few weeks of my program, I felt lonely and frustrated. I’m used to a packed schedule, but graduate school started off very slowly. I only take one course this semester, and the remainder of my work involves the solitary tasks of reading and writing. I had lots of questions, but I felt silly asking them. Most of my classmates enjoyed the company of a friend close by; I struggled to keep in touch with old friends and mentors, who were a nation away.

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Are you ready to start your journey?