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The goal of this Fulbright Canada-U.S. Embassy in Ottawa Community Leadership Program project, led by Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM) Professors Victor Armony and Bernard Duhaime, was to foster a conversation about the legacy of human rights violations and crimes against humanity in Latin America, particularly as part of a collective memory shared by many Canadians of Latin American heritage. The project’s core idea was that, by creating opportunities for the expression and exchange on these issues, it may become possible to preserve and help disseminate accounts of individual experiences by victims, to engage participants in understanding and discussing the history of state-sponsored political violence, persecution, and discrimination in Latin America, and to consider the implications of a duty of remembrance for Latin American diasporas—specific to their national origins but also as part of the larger Canadian story of inclusive citizenship and global responsibility to protect. The Latin American population in Canada is rapidly growing and integrating into the larger society. Compared to Hispanics in the United States, Canada’s Latinos constitute a much smaller, recent and diverse minority, one that as yet has not developed a full sense of community. However, there are some elements that point to an emerging common identity among Canadian Latin Americans, which are in part related to a shared experience of “low-intensity citizenship” and “incomplete democracy” in their countries of origin. In order to explore how the (personal or transmitted) memory of injustices committed by Latin American governments brings together individuals of different backgrounds, allows them to discuss their lasting effects, and also encourages them to formulate their idea of what a fully realized citizenship means, several activities were planned. read more


For a 6th consecutive year in a row, Canadian Lawyer Magazine has published its “Top 25 Most Influential Lawyers in Canada” and Pascale Fournier features in it! Nominated in the “World Stage” Category, which celebrates the influence of Canadian lawyers on the international scene, Professor Fournier was selected for her humanitarian involvement and the large scope of her academic contributions beyond Canadian borders. The selection committee used the following criteria: “We have endeavoured to select the most influential within the law over the last 18 years, looking at every area of practice. It’s about respect, ability to influence public opinion, and help shape the laws of the country; contribution to the strength and quality of legal services; and social and political influence and involvement.” A video presents the 25 profils chosen by their peers ! read more

New Brunswick is infinitely richer for the commitment, spirit and talent of Thaddeus Holownia,an internationally renowned photographer.

Mr. Holownia grew up in England and Ontario. In the late 1970s, he became a professor of fine arts at Mount Allison University, where he is currently head of the department. Mr. Holownia has produced many impressive bodies of work that push the boundaries of his art form while documenting this region’s cultural history. He is known for his Jolicure Pond series, in which he photographed the same subject in different seasons under different lighting conditions.  His photographs and book works have been acquired by some of the finest museums in Canada. His work has been shown in the United States, France, Germany, Belgium, Mexico and the Czech Republic.  Mr. Holownia is a member of the Royal Canadian Academy of Fine Arts (RCA) and is a Fulbright Canada Fellow. read more

By Joanna Harrington, a professor of law at the University of Alberta and 2015-2016 Fulbright Chair at the University of Texas-Austin
Originally published on the Globe and Mail on Wednesday, Jul. 29, 2015 3:00AM EDT

Ten years ago, the original Westminster Parliament brought to an end the ability of the executive branch to control the judicial appointments process in England and Wales for all but the most senior positions. There’s a lesson in here for Canada.

With the passage of the Constitutional Reform Act of 2005, an independent body for the appointment of judges and tribunal members was created to ensure that those holding judicial office are selected solely on the basis of merit, through a fair and open competition. The members of the Judicial Appointments Commission are themselves selected through open competition, other than the three members from the judiciary. read more

By Victoria Herrmann, Fulbright Student 2013-2014
Posted originally on The Guardian, Monday 27 July 2015

The Arctic is warming at a rate almost twice the global average, making climate change’s effects there far more intense and rapid than any other ecosystem in the world. While nature photographs of polar bears and melting ice dominate media narratives, the top of the world is home to 4m people who face an uncertain future.

Coastal erosion, forest fires and storm surges are threatening the physical and economic safety of settlements across the Arctic Ocean shoreline. Further inland, thawing permafrost is compromising the stability of transportation, sanitation and public service infrastructure built upon once-sturdy foundations. In Alaska alone, 31 villages face imminent threat of destruction from erosion and flooding. Many of these villages have 10 to 20 years of livability before their streets, schools and homes become uninhabitable. At least 12 have decided to relocate – in part or entirely – to safer ground to avoid total collapse. read more

Posted by Steve Money originally on the U.S. Department of State Official Blog
July 16, 2015

The United States and other countries are placing more attention on the Arctic as global climate change opens the region to navigation and commercial exploration. During his remarks at a State Department celebration marking the beginning of the U.S. Chairmanship of the Arctic Council in May 2015, Secretary Kerry noted that, “We want a region where people can live with hope and optimism for the future, where strong measures are being taken to mitigate environmental harm, where natural resources are managed effectively and sustainably, and where the challenges of economic development and social cohesion are being addressed in a creative, sensitive, responsible way.” read more

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